20th Century Glass

Glass Encyclopaedia - Antique & Collectable Vintage Glass Guide

Welcome to our Glass Encyclopaedia, our very own identification guide to Antique & Vintage Collectable Glass. Over the years, as dealers in glassware, we have taken thousands of pictures of glass vases, bowls, paperweights, sculptures and other glassware. After we have sold an item, it seems a shame to throw those pictures away, so we use them to create an encyclopaedia guide in the galleries shown below. We hope they will enable you discover more about the types of glass products that you are interested in collecting, or help you to identify a glass item you have come across. Please note, we are well aware that there are some gaps, for instance, we don't have much on French or American glass, this is simply because, as glass dealers in the UK, we don't come across that much of it, so we don't have many pictures with which to create a guide. Our glass encyclopaedia is aimed to be as accurate as possible. However, if you feel we have made a mistake, please contact us.

If you cannot find what you are looking for here in our glass identification guide, we strongly recommend visiting www.glassmessages.com.

Our glass identification guide covers many different types of antique and vintage collectable art glass, ranging from Victorian and Art Deco glass products from British, German, Czech and French manufacturers, to highly collectable retro art glass from Scandinavian countries including Sweden, Finland, and Denmark. We also have a large section on the famous Italian glassworks from the Venetian island of Murano, as well as the lesser known Italian region of Empoli, and we also delve into Czech & Bohemian glassware that until recently was relatively unknown. And not forgetting of course, the ever popular British glassmakers such as Whitefriars, Dartington, Vasart and Wedgwood. We are constantly improving and extending our glass encyclopaedia and galleries, so please check back frequently.

To see all antique + vintage collectable glass that we currently have available to buy, please >> click here << to visit our online glass shop.

Jump to:
Murano Glass | Empoli Glass | Scandinavian Glass | British Glass | Czech / Bohemian Glass | Maltese Glass | German Glass
Art Deco Glass | Victorian Glass | Paperweights | Other Glass


Other info:
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User Comments | Glass Encyclopaedia Updates | Glass Links | Glass Reference Database


    




 

Italian Murano Glass


The term "Murano Glass" defines glass produced on the island of Murano, near Venice, Italy. There are many different manufacturers, both past and present, based on Murano. The history of Murano Glass began in 1291, when concerns about the risk of fire to the mainly wooden buildings of Venice lead to the many glass manufacturers there being ordered to move their premises to the small island of Murano, just off the coast of Venice, Italy. Murano was already a busy trade port at the time. Murano glass artists soon became renowned for their skills in glass design, and had a monopoly on glassware production for several centuries. The Murano glass industry boomed during the 1950's/60's, exporting a vast amount of Venetian glassware as well as producing a large quantity of glassware for tourists visiting Venice. Murano glass production is still extremely active today. Due to the success and popularity of Murano glass with collectors, styles of glassware that originated on the island of Murano have been reproduced elsewhere, often of much poorer quality. These days, a lot of "Murano" glass sold on eBay or at antiques & collectable fairs can actually turn out to be made recently in China. When collecting glass, to avoid accidentally buying glass that wasn't actually made in Murano, it is a good idea to familiarise yourself with the current styles of glassware that are of Chinese origin. The best places to do this are on the website www.alibaba.com or in your local TK Maxx store.

Archimede Seguso Glass
Aureliano Toso Glass
AVeM Glass
Barbini Glass
Barovier & Toso Glass
Archimede Seguso Glass Aureliano Toso Glass AVeM Glass Barbini Glass Barovier & Toso Glass Carlo Moretti Glass

 

Cenedese Glass
Fratelli Toso Glass
Galliano Ferro Glass
Mandruzzato Glass
Salviati Glass
Seguso Vetri d'Art / Flavio Poli Glass
Cenedese Glass Fratelli Toso Glass Galliano Ferro Glass Mandruzzato Glass Salviati Glass Seguso Vetri d'Arte Glass

 

V. Nason & C. Glass
Venini Glass
Vetro Artistico Veneziano Glass
Murano Faceted Glass
Murano Glass Geodes
Murano Sommerso Glass
V. Nason & C. Glass Venini Glass Vetro Artistico Veneziano Murano Faceted Glass Murano Glass Geodes Murano Sommerso Glass

 

Murano Zanfirico Glass
Other Murano Glass
Murano Zanfirico Glass Other Murano Glass

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Italian Empoli Glass


When most people think of Italian glass, they think of the many manufacturers based on the Venetian island of Murano. But there is another area of Italy with a long history of glass production - the town of Empoli, in the Tuscany region, near Florence. There is evidence of glassware being produced in Empoli as far back as the thirteenth century. There are two main types of Empoli glass - "Verde" and "Cased". Verde (Italian for green) glass takes its name from the traditional green colour of Empoli glass, which was a result of the content of local sand used for glass production. Empoli manufacturers that produced Verde glassware include Vetrerie E. Taddei & C., Vetreria Etrusca, Vetreria Toso Bagnoli, CLAVE, and Vetrerie Empolesi. Later, cased glass became popular in Empoli, which consists of brightly coloured glass cased in a layer of clear glass, sometimes also having an internal layer of opaque white "Lattimo" glass. Some Empoli producers of cased glass are STELVIA, Cristalleria Fratelli Betti, Cristalleria Arno, CIVE, and SAVIA. There was, and still are, a large amount of manufacturers in the Empoli area involved in glass production, and it can often be difficult to identify designs by a particular maker, as any labels usually bore the name of importers, or simply read "Made in Italy". Companies that imported glass from Empoli include Alrose, Rossini, Guildcraft, Vimax, Enesco and George Hardy.

Alrose Glass
Seguso Vetri d'Art / Flavio Poli Glass
Stelvia Glass
V.B. Opaline Florence Glass
Empoli Cased Glass
Empoli Verde Glass
Alrose Glass Cristalleria Betti Glass Stelvia Glass V.B. Opaline Florence Empoli Cased Glass Empoli Verde Glass

 

Other Empoli Glass
Other Empoli Glass

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Scandinavian Glass


A large amount of stylish, artistic and functional Scandinavian glass has been produced for several centuries. The most notable Scandinavian country with a thriving glass industry is Sweden, particularly the region of Småland, where glass production began in the mid 18th century. Denmark, Finland and Norway are also home to popular manufacturers of Scandinavian glass.



Alsterfors Glass
Aseda Glasbruk
Ekenas Glass
Elme Glasbruk
Flygsfors Glass
FM Konstglas / Marcolin Glass
Alsterfors Glass Aseda Glasbruk Ekenas Glass Elme Glasbruk Flygsfors Glass FM Konstglas / Marcolin

 

Gullaskruf Glass
Hadeland Glass
Holmegaard Glass
Humppila Glass
Iittala Glass
JC (Jones & Co) Glass
Gullaskruf Glass Hadeland Glass Holmegaard Glass Humppila Glass Iittala Glass JC (Jones & Co) Glass

 

Kosta Boda Glass
Lindshammar Glass
Magnor Glass
Mats Jonasson Glass
Nuutajarvi Glass
Orrefors Glass
Kosta Boda Glass Lindshammar Glass Magnor Glass Mats Jonasson Glass Nuutajarvi Glass Orrefors Glass

 

Pukeberg Glass
Reijmyre Glass
Riihimak Glass
Ryd Glass
Sea Glasbruk
Scandi Style Cased Glass
Pukeberg Glass Reijmyre Glass Riihimaki Glass Ryd Glass Sea Glasbruk Scandi Style Cased

 

Scandi Style Hooped Glass
Other Scandinavian Glass
Scandi Style Hooped Other Scandinavian

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British Glass


The skill of making glass was brought to Britain by the Romans, but it was not until the 16th century when Venetian glass manufacturers came to Britain that British glass making began on a large scale. The invention of the coal burning furnace in the 17th century lead to glass production being moved to areas such as Stourbridge, to be close to the coal mines. To this day, these areas are still the centres of the British glass industry. This part of our encyclopaedia covers British glass makers of the 20th century.



Bagley & Co Art Deco Glass
Caithness Glass
Chance Glass
Dartington Glass
Davidson Glass
Heron Glass
Bagley Glass Caithness Glass Chance Glass Dartington Glass Davidson Glass Heron Glass

 

Jobling Art Deco Glass
Liskeard Glass
Nazeing Glass
Royal Brierley Glass
Sowerby Art Deco Glass
Steven + Williams Glass
Jobling Glass Liskeard Glass Nazeing Glass Royal Brierley Glass Sowerby Glass Steven + Williams Glass

 

Strathearn Glass
Thomas Webb Glass
Vasart Glass
Wedgwood Glass
Whitefriars Glass
Other British Glass
Strathearn Glass Thomas Webb Glass Vasart Glass Wedgwood Glass Whitefriars Glass Other British

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Czech / Bohemian Glass


Czech / Bohemian glass has been in production since around the 13th century. Popular areas of Bohemian glass production were Novy Bor, Skalice and Kamenicky Senov. It is important to note that Bohemia became Czechoslovakia in 1918, and in 1993 became the Czech Republic. This means that glass made after 1918 should be referred to as 'Czech glass' rather than 'Bohemian glass', although to confuse matters, many items of glassware produced during the 1950's and later, bear labels that read 'Bohemia Glass' or 'Bohemia Crystal'.



Borske Glass
Chribska Glass
Crystalex Glass
Harrachov Glass
Hermanova Glass
Kralik Glass
Borske Glass Chribska Glass Crystalex Glass Harrachov Glass Hermanova Glass Kralik Glass

 

Loetz / Lötz Glass
Mary Gregory Glass
Moser Glass
Mstisov Glass
Prachen Glass
Rosice Glass
Loetz / Lötz Glass Mary Gregory Glass Moser Glass Mstisov Glass Prachen Glass Rosice Glass

 

Rudolfova Glass
Skrdlovice Glass
Welz Glass
Zelezny Brod Glass
Spatter Glass
Tango Glass
Rudolfova Glass Skrdlovice Glass Welz Glass Zelezny Brod Glass Spatter Glass Tango Glass

 

Other Bohemian Glass
Other Bohemian

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Maltese Glass


Maltese glass production really began in 1968, When Michael Harris from the UK moved there to set up Mdina Glass, which began producing freeformed organic glassware, often in colours inspired from the sea, sand, earth and sky. Mdina glass was an instant success, partly due to the strong tourist industry of Malta, and prompted several other Maltese glass companies to form, such as Mtarfa, Gozo, and Phoenician glass.



Gozo Glass
Mdina Glass
Mtarfa Glass
Phenician Glass
Gozo Glass Mdina Glass Mtarfa Glass Phoenician Glass

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German & Austrian Glass


A variety of glassware has been produced in Germany and Austria over the years, including a large amount of Art Nouveau and Art Deco glass, some of which is covered in our other relevant sections. This part of our glass encyclopaedia is for German + Austrian glass not already covered in our other areas.



Bimini/Lauscha Glass
Friedrich Glass
Ingrid Glass
Oberglas Glass
Walther Glass
Other German / Austrian Glass
Bimini/Lauscha Glass Friedrich Glass Ingrid Glass Oberglas Glass Walther Glass Other German / Austrian

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Art Deco Glass


The style of Art Deco glass began during the 1920's and lasted until around the 1950's. The art deco movement began in Paris in 1925, and was popular throughout Europe during the late 1920's, spreadng to America by the 1930's. Most art deco glass was produced in Europe, mainly by French, British, German and Czech manufacturers.



Bagley & Co Art Deco Glass
Brockwitz Art Deco Glass
Cambridge Art Deco Glass
Davidson Art Deco Glass
Jobling Art Deco Glass
Sowerby Art Deco Glass
Bagley Glass Brockwitz Glass Cambridge Glass Davidson Glass Jobling Glass Sowerby Glass

 

Stölzle Art Deco Glass
Walther & Sohne Art Deco Glass
Other Art Deco Glass
Stölzle Glass Walther Glass Other Deco Glass

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Victorian Glass


Victorian glass is defined as styles of glassware that were produced during or close to the Victorian era of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) during the reign of Queen Victoria. Most of the glass shown in this part of our guide is of British origin, and some was made in European countries such as Bohemia, often intended for the British market.



Enamelled Glass
Malachite Slag Glass
Mary Gregory Glass
Milk Glass
Pearline Glass
Stourbridge Glass
Enamelled Glass Malachite / Slag Glass Mary Gregory Glass Milk Glass Pearline Glass Stourbridge Glass

 

Vaseline Glass
Guide to Other Victorian Glass
Vaseline Glass Other Victorian Glass

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Glass Paperweights


Decorative glass paperweights were first produced in around 1845, mainly in France, by several manufacturers including Baccarat and St Louis. Glass makers in other countries soon followed suit. The traditional shape of a glass paperweight is spherical, with a flat or slightly concave base. Paperweights usually contain some sort of pattern in the centre, which is often "magnified" by the thick clear glass around it. Typical patterns for paperweights include the use of floral Millefiori canes, lattice Latticino / Zanfiroco filigree, and encased air bubbles. Over the years, other shapes have been produced, including many kinds of animals and other figurines.



Caithness Glass Paperweights
Strathearn Glass Paperweights
Mats Jonasson Glass Paperweights
Other Glass Paperweights
Other Glass Paperweights
Caithness Paperweights Strathearn Paperweights Mats Jonasson Wedgwood Paperweights Other Paperweights

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Other Glass


This section of our glass encyclopaedia lists vintage collectable glassware that doesn't fall under our other categories.



Art Nouveau Glass
Cloud Glass
Depression Glass
Japanese Glass
Neodymium Glass
Opalescent Glass
Art Nouveau Glass Cloud Glass Depression Glass Japanese Glass Neodymium Glass Opalescent Glass

 

UV Reactive Uranium Glass
Miscellaneous Glass
Uranium Glass Miscellaneous Glass

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Comments Recent Gallery Additions

Rebecca | 17th September 2012
Just wanted to say, THANKYOU!! Your website has been a fantastic help for my glass collecting addiction!

WW | 31st July 2012
Beautiful and easy to navigate. Thanks!

Brian | 20th July 2012
This site is been the "FIND" of my dreams. Thank you so much for creating an amazing site with a world of knowledge for us all to unitize. Very helpful, easy to navigate... PERFECT!!!! is the word.

Katy | 4th December 2011
I just wanted to tell you how wonderful, knowledgeable, and user friendly your web site is. It has been a pleasure taking a tour through your inventory. I will check in often to see what new stock you are advertising.

Paula | 9th November 2011
Great job! Loved the global feel.

Cori | 30th October 2011
Great website, good information... At the chance of sounding greedy... More please??

Andy | 22nd September 2011
Excellent website, very informative indeed. Thank you.

Christina | 17th February 2011
Your website is great and easy to use, i find it very useful as im a novice at glass identifying, Im glad i found you on Google and will use your website for future use.

Susanna | 6th January 2011
Brilliant website! Possibly the best I've seen. Can see many hours being "wasted" looking at this!

Lana | 23rd November 2010
Thank you for your website! I was able to know the maker and origin of about 19-30 pieces of art glass that I have collected throughout the years. Your site was a wealth of information and I love it. It has been marked as a top favorite and I am sure that I will refer to it often. Thank you again.

David Parkinson | 16th October 2010
I recently discovered your site, and just wanted to say what a great find it is. Very informative, thank you very much. Best Regards, David Parkinson.

Sandy Montgomery | 19th September 2010
Hi, I come back to your page on a regular basis as I find your site one of the best to navigate + a lot of great knowledge to be gained. It has helped me identify one or two pieces and left me with a few puzzles! Cheers Sandy.

Marie at Bright Collectables | 17th September 2010
Hi, I love your website.  I've just ordered a book through it so hopefully that will give a little back to you. Thanks, Marie.

Mrs O'Shea | 26th August 2010
Found this site very useful and informative, ended up looking at all the beautiful glass shown, not just what i was looking for.





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Glass Encyclopaedia Updates

September 2012
New sections added for Bohemian glassmakers Moser and Loetz / Lötz, Hadeland of Norway, FM Konstglas of Sweden, and V. Nason & C. of Murano.

March 2012
Added a feature for using Google search to look for information + images on various websites at once. The image search is especially useful when trying to identify a glass product. We have one for searching glass forums (click here) and one for searching auction related websites (click here).

December 2011
Loads of pictures added to almost every section of the glass encyclopaedia this month, also new pages added for Finnish glassworks Humppila, German manufacturer Friedrich Kristall, and a whole new area for Italian Empoli glass, including pages for Empoli Verde glass and Empoli cased glass among others.

November 2011
New section added for Japanese Glass! Watch this space, as I expect glassware from Japan to become much more popular as more people become aware of it. Chances are, you already have a piece of Japanese glass in your collection, and don't even know it!

July 2011
Several new sections added, including Vetro Artistico Veneziano to Murano Glass, Crystalex, Harrachov, Kralik + Welz added to Czech / Bohemian Glass, Stourbridge to British Glass.

March 2011
A general update with lots of pictures added to various pages including the labels page.

January 2011
A few more sections added to our glass encyclopaedia - Lindshammar of Sweden, Magnor of Norway, Oberglas of Austria, and Stelvia of Italy. Also many pictures added to various pages.

November 2010
Finally got around to scanning in our copies of Davidson + Sowerby product catalogues, which are available to view in our new glass catalogues section. Also new this month are pages on glass labels, and glass signatures + marks. Enjoy!

October 2010
Created a new section for glass paperweights, which we will hopefully expand on soon. Also added lots of new pictures to many various pages.

September 2010
The Maltese glass section was split into Mdina and Mtarfa, with galleries added for Gozo and Phoenician Glass. Created a new section for German & Austrian glass, including Ingrid & Walther. Also added 2 galleries to Bohemian glass - Zelezny Brod and Prachen, and added pages for Opalescent glass, Depression glass, and Neodymium (Alexandrite) glass.

August 2010
Updated several of our Victorian glass sections including quite a bit of work on the Vaseline + Pearline glass pages, as well as adding a section on Mary Gregory glass.

July 2010
This month we have done huge updates to all sections of our glass encyclopaedia, with many new images of glassware added to each glass guide, as well as extra info, and some helpful glass reference links.

June 2010
Many gallery additions & more information added to glass manufacturers in the Murano glass section of our glass encyclopaedia.

April 2010
Large updates to the Riihimaen Lasi Oy / Riihimaki Glass section of our antique + collectable glass encyclopaedia, with lots of new pieces of glassware added to the gallery.

November 2009
A lot of work done on the Glass Encyclopaedia this month. The Murano glass area was updated, with sections added on Alrose glass and Galliano Ferro glassware. Several additions to Scandinavian glass, including Alsterfors, Ekenas, Elme Glasbruk, Gullaskruf, Iittala, Mats Jonasson, Pukeberg, Ryd and Sea Glasbruk. Czech glassware had a complete revamp, splitting the Czech glass section into separate manufacturers, including: Borske, Chribska, Hermanova, Mstisov, Rosice, Rudolfova and Skrdlovice. A brand new section was added for British glass, with Chance, Dartington, Heron, Liskeard, Nazeing, Strathearn, Vasart, Wedgwood and Whitefriars. And last but not least, Brockwitz and Cambridge were added to Art Deco glassware.

Empoli Glass Decanter
Vintage Empoli Glass Decanter

Empoli Cased Glass Vase
Vintage Empoli Cased Glass Vase

Empoli Verde Glass Vase
Vintage Empoli Verde Glass Vase

German Glass Vase
Vintage German Glass Vase

Humppila Glass Bowl
Vintage Humppila Finnish Glass Bowl

Japanese Glass Vase
Vintage Japanese Glass Vase

Stevens + Williams Glass Bowl
Vintage Stevens + Williams Glass Bowl

Sklo Union Czech Glass Vase
Vintage Sklo Union Czech Glass Vase

Swedish Glass Vase
Vintage Swedish Glass Vase

Caithness Glass Paperweight
Vintage Caithness Glass Paperweight

Prachen Czech Glass Vase
Vintage Prachen Glass

Gozo Maltese Glass Vase
Vintage Gozo Glass

Mary Gregory Glass Tumbler
Antique Mary Gregory Glass

Davidson Pearline Glass Creamer
Antique Pearline Glass

French Milk Glass Vase
Antique Milk Glass

Czech Spatter Glass Vase
Vintage Czech Spatter Glass Vase

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